Trauma, Stress and Early Childhood

Over the past several weeks, Dr. Leeson and several of my class colleagues discussed the affects that trauma, whether slight or severe, has on young children and their ability to process, cope and survive traumatic situations.

Strolling through my collection of articles, today I ran across a post from NEA Today Express entitled How Trauma Changes Children’s Brains.  Researchers are discovering that continued stress and trauma can change the makeup of a child’s intellect and thinking (Flannery, 2016).  As educators it is important for us to include conversations about stress and traumatic events weekly with our students.  Presenting a calm environment for them to openly discuss issues and concerns where their peers and teachers can provide avenues of how to handle different situations. Do you agree or disagree?     All comments are welcomed.

I’ve included the link to the article here.

Reference

Flannery, M.E. (2016) How Trauma Changes Children’s Brains. NEA Today.  Retrieved from http://neatoday.org/2016/05/17/trauma-and-children/?utm_source=nea_today_express&utm_medium=email&utm_content=trauma&utm_campaign=160601neatodayexpress

One thought on “Trauma, Stress and Early Childhood

  1. I think it is very interesting. I am glad you shared on the WUECO page. While teachers may not be able to control the colors on the walls, there are so many things we can do for young children.

    “Ritchie also recommends teaching strategies that include predictable classroom routines with advance warning to students of any changes; asking students to repeat verbal instructions, using more written instructions, and also using visual prompts for multi-step directions, like a sticky post-it note on a desk.” What can we do to make a classroom emotionally safe for children?

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