The Adjourning Process in Group Communication and Collaboration

During the first two years I worked at Department of Labor, I was part of the technical team that traveled throughout the United States installing phone systems. My role was the technical liaison for my customers and I interfaced with local telephone companies, other Department of Labor administrative agencies, and the vendor with whom we purchased sixteen telephone/voice mail phone servers from. Most of our prep work and implementation planning was done remotely. For the actual site visits, the vendor scheduled to be on site for five days, while our technical team scheduled our physical site visit for seven days. Three days prior to the actual installation, both teams met with the customer to finalize installation plans. I worked closely with our vendor in staging equipment, final testing of circuits and 911 requirements. On behalf of my customer, I reviewed final implementation plans, setup and coordinated phone and voice mail training. There was a trust and camaraderie established to ensure we accounted for each contingency and to ensure the transition went as smoothly as possible. At the end of the vendor’s fourth day, the entire team would meet for dinner to celebrate the success of the installation and make preparations for the next upcoming cut over. Although I no longer travel the country in that capacity for my customers at Department of Labor, I’ve made some lasting professional relationships with many of the technicians and program managers I’ve worked with. It was our ability to work together as a unit during the installation process that resulted in acquiring complete trust and respect from each member represented.

Since returning to school in 2006, I’ve obtained a bachelor’s degree in Communication Studies, and a professional certification in Information Assurance all online. Each class I met a new group of colleagues and professors that I had to collaborate with. Since attending Walden to obtain my master’s I’ve had the opportunity to interact with some colleagues in more than one class. As we come to the end of our core subject matters and begin concentrating on our specialized training, I will miss the familiarity I’ve shared with many of you. I hope through blogs and emails that I will still interact with many of you, as you are an inspiration to me and why I so want to follow in your footsteps. This has given me an avenue to an endless wealth of knowledge in which I should never find myself lacking. Thank you for being a part of my journey.2013-03-23 10.07.01

2 thoughts on “The Adjourning Process in Group Communication and Collaboration

  1. I agree that trust and respect are so important when you are working as part of a team. That is something that makes it hard to leave that team, when you know you are leaving those who you have grown to trust, to rely on, and that you respect and who respect you. But I also believe that the more we continue to work with others, the more we learn to form those relationships with others. This practice on our part also provides us with the experience we need to help children in this process. Children learn from us. When we learn how to work with many different people and to grow from their knowledge and experience and form good relationships, we can teach this skill to the children. We can form those strong bonds of trust and respect with them and provide them with the experiences that we have enjoyed ourselves.

  2. Everything Education, I think that it was wonderful that you guys “At the end of the vendor’s fourth day, the entire team would meet for dinner to celebrate the success of the installation and make preparations for the next upcoming cut over.” I think that if most companies would celebrate “milestones” the moral of their teams would be better. It goes to show your appreciation for the team you work with. You also help me to become aware that our blogs do “… given me an avenue to an endless wealth of knowledge in which I should never find myself lacking.”
    References
    Abudi, G. (2010). The five stages of team development: A case study. Retrieved from http://www.projectsmart.co.uk/the-five-stages-of-team-development-a-case-study.html
    Laureate Education (Producer). (2011). Team building strategies [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu
    O’Hair, D., & Wiemann, M. (2012). Real communication: An introduction. New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s.

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